The IRCF peer reviewed “Journal Reptiles & Amphibians, Conservation and Natural History” has migrated!

By Sandra Binns • In Blog, Blue Iguana, Design, IRCF JournalComments Off on The IRCF peer reviewed “Journal Reptiles & Amphibians, Conservation and Natural History” has migrated!

Readers can now access the journal at the University of Kansas portal journals.ku.edu/reptilesandamphibians. You are encouraged to register at journals.ku.edu/reptilesandamphibians/user/register in order to receive the Table of Contents for each new issue as it is published. All of our back issues are also available for your perusal. Volume 1 No.

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Island Iguanas: Saving the World’s Rarest Lizards

By Sandra Binns • In Blog, Blue Iguana, IRCF JournalComments Off on Island Iguanas: Saving the World’s Rarest Lizards

The Science of Saving Species, published by San Diego Zoo Global. Institute for Conservation Research. Volume 2 2017, This issue features “Island Iguanas: Saving the World’s Rarest Lizards”. CLICK TO DOWNLOAD ARTICLE

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An evaluation of the diet of Cyclura iguanas in the Dominican Republic

By Sandra Binns • In Blog, Blue Iguana, IRCF Journal, Sisters Island IguanaComments Off on An evaluation of the diet of Cyclura iguanas in the Dominican Republic

Authors: Stesha Ann Pasachnik & Victor Martin-Velez Understanding the diet of endangered species can benefit conservation efforts that involve habitat preservation and restoration. Caribbean rock iguanas, Cyclura spp., are among the most endangered lizards in the world, yet little is known about the diets of many of these species. In

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Helicobacter Disease Threatens The Existence of the Blue Iguana

By Sandra Binns • In Blog, Blue Iguana, IRCF JournalComments Off on Helicobacter Disease Threatens The Existence of the Blue Iguana

PRESS RELEASE, Grand Cayman, 7 July 2017 On May 5th, 2015, Blue Iguana Recovery Programme (BIRP) staff found a wild Blue Iguana (Cyclura lewisi) displaying signs of lethargy within the Queen Elizabeth II Botanic Park (QEIIBP). The Blue Iguana was identified as “obw” and taken to Island Veterinary Services (IVS)

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